Testimonials

Parent
  March usually is the dreaded exam season everywhere. This period of time involves a lot of stress and anxiety for both the parents & children. But, during this time, it is the role of the parents to remain calm and provide unlimited moral support to the kids. Displaying nervousness and anxiety can deter the confidence of the child, leading them to be distracted and apprehensive about their future. As parents you might be stressed and say unimportant things that could create blocks in your child’s mind. Resist any kind of urge to threaten or mention things like “your entire life depends on this, or you won’t get into a good college!”. Also, avoid mentioning any amounts of money or financial sacrifice you’ve had to go through to put them through school. A holistic child growth: Parents also need to understand that exams are not the end of the world; and a child should grow up in a holistic environment that involves stress-free activities like watching TV, playing games or spending time with friends and family. This would ensure their education is successful and they will grow into a mindful individual. As parents here are some tips that you should definitely follow:
  1. Let them study the way they want to: As parents, you should always respect your child’s studying style. They might want to study alone for hours together or study with their peers. Sometimes when children are studying together, their understanding of subjects is much clearer as it involves questioning, revising and learning together that does not happen when they are alone.
  2. Be a support system: Being supportive in any way will help the child study better. Help them prepare a studying schedule, or put up a timetable in the house so that everyone knows what exam is the following day. Sit with them, have conversations about things other than studies; this will ensure they’re relaxed and will be able to prepare better.
  3. Let them be involved in activities: It is not good to be an old school parent who cut off internet & TV time during board exams. The child does not have the capacity to study the entire day. Taking periodical breaks in the middle is essential. It’s a positive distraction that ensures that after the break studying is faster and better.
  4. Ensure balanced meals: It is the parent’s responsibility that during exam time they should feed the children a balanced meal of carbohydrates and proteins. So ensure they eat lots of vegetables, eggs, fish and fruits. Once in awhile junk food can be allowed, but not regularly.
  5. Do not put any pressure: Parents should understand that exams and marks are important but not more than the health of their child. There are more things in life to cherish than this. Let your child breathe, and avoid putting any pressure on them by reminding them to study, comparing them with peers or giving them any advice.
Our in-house counsellor Sanaaz Tyagi says, “It’s an important time of the year and parents are all worked up over the upcoming exams. But, what's essentially important to keep in mind is that you stressing out is only going to further stress your already worried child. Stay calm and reassure your child that you believe in their capabilities. Also, provide them with reassurance and support that they need to overcome their apprehensions. What's most significant is to remember that academics are a part of life and not life itself. “ Lastly, as parents it is important that you are updated about anything important happening at your child’s school, be it events or informative workshops; you can start with reading newsletters, or checking the school/exam websites, and attend educational sessions that will lead to your child performing as per his/her capabilities.
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Student
When our bus pulled up along the jagged, uneven sidewalk of the TC Halli Government school- for our first day of Community Outreach- my mind was swirling with curiosity. What would the children be like? Would they like me? Would it be difficult to communicate with them? I quickly pushed my thoughts away, as I spotted a crowd of giggling kids enthusiastically waving at us- bright, happy smiles spread across their eager faces. I found myself smile as I noticed their genuine eagerness and excitement as they grabbed our hands and pulled us inside- chattering happily. Honestly…I was really surprised and a bit overwhelmed by their friendly and happy attitude. I had never done anything like this before, and I had always wanted to do something to help our community. I was curious to see what this experience had to offer me. I set my bag on the table, and pulled out a colorful picture book, choosing to sit in front of a young girl in fourth grade. She beamed as I opened the book, and I noticed her eyes widening at the sight of the colorful pictures. Her bright eyes were filled with curiosity as I flipped the pages, listening attentively. As I glanced at the gray walls, and dull environment- I knew how she must have been feeling. She lifted her hand and slowly traced the picture as if she couldn’t believe what she was seeing- and it seemed like she had drifted into her own world. But then- as if just remembering that I was there, she glanced at me cautiously. I smiled encouragingly, and she replied with a shy smile. I spent the next hour flipping through the colorful pages, and watching her enthusiastic expressions, as she tried to pronounce each word. We came to a page filled with a bright scene- with various animals scattered around. I spotted a cat, and she peered at it carefully. Recognition flashed in her eyes, and she looked like she was trying to remember its name. I decided to test my Kannada- to test my general knowledge- and to see if remembered anything from all those third language classes. I pointed at the cat. “Biku.” I told her, confidently. She giggled, clamping a hand over her mouth. “No- Bekku.” She corrected, smiling. I blushed, and decided to stick to the English. The time I spent teaching and reading to the children left such a deep impact on me. At the end of the visit, I felt emotionally attached to them, and so moved. I really wanted to do something for them, and I guess the best thing I could do was, teach them English. I was so touched by how sweet and affectionate they were, and I don’t think I’ve ever met a batch of kids so excited to learn something new. I think this is a truly a great step Inventure is taking – extending a hand to the rural community, and encouraging us all to help these kids. Looking at the conditions there, and their simple way of living- you can’t help but admire their strength. You can’t help but feel a sense of determination- a need to help the ones less fortunate than us. I think there’s actually a lot we can learn from them. Community Outreach is a beautiful, and special experience that all of us can learn from, and remember forever. It was like breaking out of the cushioned surroundings we live in, and experiencing the conditions of those less privileged than us- which opened up a new perspective on the life and people around me. More than the feeling of knowing I was doing something to help the society was the sense of pride and happiness I felt after the visit. Making others happy really make you happy. No matter how cliché it sounds- it’s true! We sixth graders really enjoyed the experience, especially because it was an entirely new experience for all of us. Here’s what we have to say: “I feel that the community outreach is a great experience for us to learn about our community and conditions. But what’s more important than just social awareness is the pride and joy after helping less privileged children. It’s been an amazing experience for me and my classmates. The bright smiling face of the children as we left was one of the happiest moments of my life!”
  • Mahika
“I found community outreach an enjoyable experience. We met other kids who spoke a different language and thought in a different way. It was such an amazing experience and the kids were so sweet. We found it a two-way learning session. They taught us some things, and we taught them some things!”
  • Akriti
“I loved the experience as it gave me an opportunity to connect with slightly less privileged children. I enjoyed teaching them as it gave me a chance and a hearty feeling that I was helping and making a difference in my society.”
  • Divya
“I think getting to visit a government school to make kids happy and have fun- and also to interact with them; it’s just so special and touching. I hope we spend all our SUPW periods this way!”      -    Siya By - Mitali (6B)
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