Follow Your Dreams by Anusha Ramji

I’ve been writing ever since I could remember. It’s one way I can feel absolutely free and understand myself. Writing is an amazing creative outlet and words are a place where dreams become reality. There are no confines or a claustrophobic cage pushing you in- you can express yourself in any way possible.

Last year I got to go for a workshop at the Times of India (TOI) office in Bangalore where I learned about journalism. I’ve always been passionate about writing so I’m very thankful to the school for giving me this opportunity. It taught me to make the most of the chances I get. To put it simply, as Eminem once rapped “You better lose yourself in the music, the moment, you own it, you better never let it go, You only get one shot, do not miss your chance to blow, this opportunity comes once in a lifetime.” It also made me understand the importance of press and media as a whole. The media is the voice of the people. The workshop told me to harness the abilities I have and got me pumped to write more and more. I wrote for the paper whenever possible because it made me feel happy to have my efforts recognized.

TOI would e-mail me often asking for inputs on various matters and I tried to give an honest opinion. I also sent in articles in my free time. I was surprised when I was chosen for an award because I’d never expected it. I realized that when you work hard, your efforts will be rewarded.

During the awards function, Karnataka’s Agriculture Minister Mr. Krishna Byre Gowda presided over a pre-introductory session to a mock press conference. The topic was ‘Why is a clean political system still a dream for India?’ and he gave us insight into the world of Indian politics and corruption. He spoke of the problems in our nation such as poor education, inequality amongst varied castes and religions, the fact that people are unaware of their rights and opportunities such as the ‘Right to Information’, the filth of society and of course, the reluctance of politicians to ‘clean’ themselves’. He pointed out that it was up to us, the people, to improve the system by using our rights such as voting. He, however commended India for being the only country to remain ‘truly democratic’.

After the discussion, the awards were given out. When I received the award, I felt happy, because I knew that I was doing something I loved wholeheartedly which is what made the difference.

I hope in the near future to do something involving writing because I feel that it’s a weapon which can take the crowds by the storm, without killing any innocent souls or destroying entire countries. After all, they say “The pen is mightier than the sword”. To anybody who is passionate about something, go chase it and put your hundred percent into it. Who knows? You might become the next world leader, sportsman, actor or simply someone who can make a difference in the world.